2017-06-04 / Insight

Ed-Tech students restore sheriff’s department trailer

BY NICHOLAS PUGLIESE
810-452-2601 • npugliese@mihomepaper.com


Students in the Ed-Tech Automotive Mechanics and Auto Body and Collision Repair programs restored a more than 15-year-old trailer for use in the Lapeer County Sheriff’s Dept. Detective Bureau. Undersheriff Jeremy Howe (left) and Sheriff Scott McKenna (right) thanked the students and faculty for their hard work on Friday. 
Photo by Nicholas Pugliese Students in the Ed-Tech Automotive Mechanics and Auto Body and Collision Repair programs restored a more than 15-year-old trailer for use in the Lapeer County Sheriff’s Dept. Detective Bureau. Undersheriff Jeremy Howe (left) and Sheriff Scott McKenna (right) thanked the students and faculty for their hard work on Friday. Photo by Nicholas Pugliese ATTICA TWP. — Lapeer County Sheriff Scott McKenna and Undersheriff Jeremy Howe were on hand to see the result of a project between the sheriff’s department and the Auto Body and Collision Repair (ABCR) and Automotive Mechanics programs at the Lapeer Education and Technology Center (Ed-Tech).

Students enrolled in the ABCR Program at Ed-Tech spent the better part of four weeks repairing and restoring a sheriff’s department-owned trailer, which according to McKenna and Howe will now be used to haul equipment for the department’s detective bureau.

“Students checked wiring, lights, wheel bearings, they really went over it with a fine-toothed comb,” said collision repair instructor Luke Childers. “It’s got a new nose cone now, and they scrubbed it down, fixed some nasty damaged areas and sprayed it black.”

The work was tied into the students’ curriculum, and as lessons changed, so did their focus with the trailer. “We used the trailer for training purposes,” said auto mechanic instructor John Howell. “Most of the time, it all fit together.”

The ABCR Program at Ed-Tech is an ASE/NATEF certified program where students learn the fundamentals of re-finishing, replacing and repairing damaged auto body panels, along the way gaining experience in the proper use of tools and equipment needed in a realworld auto body facility. Also NATEF certified, the Automotive Mechanics program prepares students to take four of the eight Michigan certification tests in automotive mechanics, including braking systems, suspension and steering, and engine tune-up and performance.

Howe said that the trailer will be used to haul equipment needed by detectives to any major crimes scenes that may occur in Lapeer County.

“It’s a good community service project for the class, and we were able to help the sheriff’s department,” said Howell. “It was good all the way around.” The trailer will now be sent to be decaled with the sheriff’s department logos.

Students said the trailer was in rough shape before it was dropped off at the Ed-Tech facility, its paint a faded white and dozens of repairs, large and small, were needed. The trailer was acquired via a grant more than 15 years ago, and has mostly been used as storage in recent years.

“We brainstormed what we could do with it,” said Howe. “The detective bureau could really use it, (all the equipment) is currently in their cars, and this way everything will be in the trailer and they can just hook up and go.”

“It’s kind of nice, having these programs at Ed-Tech,” said McKenna. “Ed-Tech is a gold mine for kids in this county.”

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